Saturday, June 16, 2007

Writing et al

One of the promises I made to myself when I left work was that I wouldn't be doing any housework at the weekend. What have I done today? After a leisurely start with coffee whilst reading The Poe Shadow in bed, then a quick look (well not very quick) at blogs, I started to write about Wilberforce, when I was overcome with the need to tidy the house. Old habits do die hard and I spent the rest of the morning until now tidying up, dusting and vacuuming - still got upstairs to do. Then I remembered my promise and slowed down.


Litlove recently wrote a Writing Meme . The idea is to write seven random points about writing and then tag someone else. If you fancy doing this consider yourself tagged.


Here are my seven, in no particular order:

  1. I disliked doing 'Precis' in English Language lessons at school. The teacher never seemed to give us enough time and it had to be done quickly. Strange that now I find myself doing something similar in writing this blog and I'm enjoying it, but of course it's my choice and in my own time.

  2. I once set out to write a novel about life at a fairground. I didn't get very far, knowing next to nothing about fairgrounds. I haven't tried since.

  3. I 'm excellent at reading books on how to write, but just can't bring myself to do the exercises they suggest. It all seems so boring. But last year I did write 'Morning Pages', which is one of Julia Cameron's ideas in her Right to Write. I tried it for a few weeks and did enjoy it. The idea is that first thing in the morning you write and don't read what you have written. Looking back I see that I wrote about my dreams, words, thoughts on what I'd be doing later on in the day, and my childhood.

  4. After I'd read Wilfred Owen's war poems I wrote a poem on the horrors of war and submitted it for the school magazine. It must have been awful and it didn't get in. I still fancy writing poetry.

  5. In my previous job in local government I wrote many reports for the councillors to make decisions on various applications. This involved investgiating the claims, putting all the evidence for and against the proposals with a recommendation. This was satisfying, even if they were not always to everybody's liking.

  6. I am usually not very satisfied with what I write and constantly revise and cut what I've written. This was difficult before the computer made it easy. Previously my drafts were full of crossings out, insertions with asterisks, paragraphs cut and stapled at the right place. Now cutting and pasting is so much easier.

  7. Finally a couple of quotations to add to Litlove's:

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing." Kingsley Amis


"Read over your compositions, and where ever you meet with a passage which you think is particularly fine, strike it out." Samuel Johnson

I'll post my thoughts on Wilberforce will be next, that is after I've finished re-writing and cutting it!

3 comments:

litlove said...

Oh I mean to do morning pages and think it's too much discipline for me to contemplate! And thank goodness for the word processor. When I was doing a PhD the thought of typing with three sheets of carbon made me want to go on hands and knees and kiss the monitor!
Great answers!

Dorothy W. said...

I love those quotations about writing! I'm not a writer, but still those morning pages sound kind of fun.

Funny, I don't think I've ever been overcome with the need to tidy the house ...

StuckInABook said...

The Morning Pages exercise does sound interesting, and potentially useful. I have a fun 'book' called 'Writer's Block' - it's a cube in shape, each page having a word or image to give inspiration. More amusing than useful, I think - though could provide inspiration for blog entries if nothing else!