Saturday, February 16, 2008

The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster

My Celebrate the Author Challenge book for February was going to be one by Amy Tan or Alice Walker, who have birthdays in February. However, I was reading The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster, whose birthday is also in February, so I changed my list. That’s a good thing about this challenge – I don’t have to stick with the books I originally thought I was going to read. Somehow there is an obstacle in my mind about challenges. I love the idea of them and deciding what to read but when it gets to the time I’m “supposed” to read a book for some strange reason I don’t want to read it. After all I’m reading for pleasure and I like to read as and when the fancy takes me – not to a fixed programme.



From the title The Book of Illusions I expected to be deceived, that people and events would not be as they seemed and I was not disappointed. This book is full of illusions. It tells the stories of two men, David Zimmer, a professor whose wife and two sons were killed in a plane crash and Hector Mann, a silent movie star who disappeared mysteriously in 1929. David is plunged into depression and “lived in a blur of alcoholic grief and self-pity” until he watched a clip from one of Hector’s films. It made him laugh. He became obsessed with Hector, the man in the white tropical suit, with a thin black mustache, which Hector used as an “instrument of communication”, speaking a “language without words, its wiggles and flutters are as clear and comprehensible as a message tapped out in Morse code. … the mustache monologues.” In typical silent movie style Hector with his slicked-back hair, thin and greasy little mustache and white suit is the target and focal point of every mishap.

David takes leave of absence from the university and studies Hector’s films, eventually writing a book about him, intrigued by his disappearance. Then he receives a letter from Hector’s wife, in which she reveals that Hector is alive and wants to meet David before he dies. He asks for proof that Hector is indeed alive. The rest of the novel reveals what happened to Hector and why he disappeared, in a series of melodramatic incidents. It’s a tense tale as David accompanied by Alma, directed by Hector to persuade David to visit him, rushes to the Blue Stone ranch in New Mexico, where he finds Hector on his deathbed, guarded by Frieda his wife who seems to resent David’s presence.

There are stories within stories; subterfuge, crime, shootings, issues of identity, love, death, disguises and deception abound in this book. A few quotes give the flavour:

“The world was an illusion that had to be re-invented every day.”

“I was writing about things I couldn’t see any more, and I had to present them in purely visual terms. The whole experience was like a hallucination.”

“The world was full of holes … once on the other side of one of those holes, you were free of yourself, free of your life, free of your death, free of everything that belonged to you.”

“Life was a fever dream … reality was a groundless world of figments and hallucinations, a place where everything you imagined became true.”

“If I never saw the moon, then the moon was never there.”

Truly a book of illusions – about films that are in themselves illusions, the illusion that we can know another person, that there is a future, illusions about love, and identity – it moves in and out of reality. There are many layers to this novel; it’s a detective story with gothic overtones, a love story and a novel about the passing of the 20th century, ending as the last weeks of the century approach, that century which “no one in his right mind will be sorry to see end.” It’s a circular story as well, ending with the hope that it “will start all over again.”

5 comments:

litlove said...

Oooh, I have this on my shelves to read and you've made it sound very tempting! I might have to try and clear a place for it in the queue!

Lisa said...

Wow, this sounds like quite a book. It seems to have a little bit of everything. I definitely agree with you regarding challenges. I like the idea of participating and hopefully broadening my reading horizons, but I too often find myself not wanting to read the appropriate book at the time.

Table Talk said...

I have a friend, Steve, who is literally waiting at the bookshop the day any new Auster is due. He's always on at me to read him and somehow I've never got round to it. You and him together are pretty persuasive.

BooksPlease said...

Litlove, I'm looking forward to reading your thoughts on this book.

Lisa, I'm in two minds about challenges - do they expand my reading or limit it? I may write a post on this sometime.

Table Talk, this is only the second book by Auster that I've read. The first one was Oracle Night, which I also enjoyed.

Lezlie said...

I read "Timbuktu" by Paul Auster earlier this year and just loved it! I plan on reading more Auster and will definitely check this one out.

Lezlie